Only two and a half weeks of this semester left. Wowza. 

Wow! I got on tumblr this evening (well, I guess it is night) to find that my followers total jumped much higher! Hello to everyone new! I’m Emily, kind of a huge nerd, and definitely a Jesus geek. I’m finishing up a couple of undergrad degrees then hoping to go to graduate school. I just wanted to say hi and that my ask is always open! God bless! :)

"Every time we sin we cry “Crucify Him!” and yet, when we cry over sin, He would willingly be crucified again."

We’re talking about Thomas Merton in one of my theology classes. Just curious what other Catholics think about him. Thoughts?

It’s been a while since I’ve actually said why I’m so busy. While I’m taking my usual course load (18 credit hours), a number of those classes required large projects. One project is currently being reviewed by the Archabbot (yikes!) and is awaiting final approval. I’ve been researching my thesis so I can write it next semester (anti-popery in colonial MA v. anti-popery in colonial VA) and have been volunteering twice a week at a local museum to gain experience. I’m still working, still volunteering with campus ministry, and am trying to spend as much time as possible with my friends for reasons I’ll explain in coming weeks. By the end of the semester, I’ll have written 90+ pages for a variety of classes. I’m quite happy with my semester although I look forward to having more down time next year. I’ve started the grad school search and have only been getting on this site to read. (Yes, I have kept up with at least reading the Catholic blogs). 

Until next time, God bless!

boysandsunshine:

i ask you all to pray for my family and i. we lost our great grandma on saturday and i just found out this morning. this is the first loss in our family since the sudden death of my aunt this past summer and she is the first of any of my grandparents to pass. i’m very sad that i won’t be able to be at the funeral, but i know i will be there in spirit with my family. any prayers you can say would help. thanks sweethearts. 

This is a very good friend of mine. I ask that you extend her some prayer time!

I’ve been very, very, very busy this semester which is why my post count has gone down drastically.

Whenever someone assumes I know the history of the everything just because I’m a history major

mylifeasahistorymajor:

image

mediumaevum:

Eilmer of Malmesbury was an 11th-century English Benedictine monk best known for his early attempt at a gliding flight using wings.
He is known to have written on astrology. All that is known of him is written by the eminent medieval historian William of Malmesbury in about 1125. In his words:

He was a man learned for those times, of ripe old age, and in his early youth had hazarded a deed of remarkable boldness. He had by some means, I scarcely know what, fastened wings to his hands and feet so that, mistaking fable for truth, he might fly like Daedalus, and, collecting the breeze upon the summit of a tower, flew for more than a furlong [201 metres]. But agitated by the violence of the wind and the swirling of air, as well as by the awareness of his rash attempt, he fell, broke both his legs and was lame ever after. He used to relate as the cause of his failure, his forgetting to provide himself a tail.

Eilmer typified the inquisitive spirit of medieval enthusiasts who developed small drawstring toy helicopters, windmills, and sophisticated sails for boats. Church artists increasingly showed angels with ever more accurate depictions of bird-like wings. This led to a general acceptance that air was something that could be “worked.” Flying was thus not magical, but could be attained by physical effort and human reasoning.
image: (x) Detail from Edwardian Stained glass in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire. This image is the work of Bell & Co of Bristol. It dates from 1921.

mediumaevum:

Eilmer of Malmesbury was an 11th-century English Benedictine monk best known for his early attempt at a gliding flight using wings.

He is known to have written on astrology. All that is known of him is written by the eminent medieval historian William of Malmesbury in about 1125. In his words:

He was a man learned for those times, of ripe old age, and in his early youth had hazarded a deed of remarkable boldness. He had by some means, I scarcely know what, fastened wings to his hands and feet so that, mistaking fable for truth, he might fly like Daedalus, and, collecting the breeze upon the summit of a tower, flew for more than a furlong [201 metres]. But agitated by the violence of the wind and the swirling of air, as well as by the awareness of his rash attempt, he fell, broke both his legs and was lame ever after. He used to relate as the cause of his failure, his forgetting to provide himself a tail.

Eilmer typified the inquisitive spirit of medieval enthusiasts who developed small drawstring toy helicopters, windmills, and sophisticated sails for boats. Church artists increasingly showed angels with ever more accurate depictions of bird-like wings. This led to a general acceptance that air was something that could be “worked.” Flying was thus not magical, but could be attained by physical effort and human reasoning.

image: (x) Detail from Edwardian Stained glass in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire. This image is the work of Bell & Co of Bristol. It dates from 1921.

(Source: Wikipedia)

thatcatholicgentleman replied to your post: I am so, so, so excited to say that I …

CONGRATS!

THANKS! I am insanely excited! It’s all I can do to try and write my theology paper!